418 results found, based on your search criteria

Principality Building Society - First Home Steps Account (Issue 2)

Principality Building Society - First Home Steps Account (Issue 2)

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.50% AER

Open with

£1

Opened by

You cannot make withdrawals from this account. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid annually. The maximum you can pay into the account is £25,000

UBL - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account

UBL - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.50% AER

Open with

£2,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid annually. The maximum you can pay into the account is £1,000,000

UBL - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account Maturity

UBL - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account Maturity

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.50% AER

Open with

£2,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid on maturity. The maximum you can pay into the account is £1,000,000

UBL - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account Monthly

UBL - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account Monthly

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.50% AER

Open with

£2,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid monthly. The maximum you can pay into the account is £1,000,000

Union Bank - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit

Union Bank - 5 Year Fixed Term Deposit

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.50% AER

Open with

£2,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid annually. The maximum you can pay into the account is £250,000

Zopa - 5 Year Fixed Term Savings

Zopa - 5 Year Fixed Term Savings

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.46% AER

Open with

£1,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid monthly. The maximum you can pay into the account is £250,000

Aldermore - 5 Year Fixed Rate Bond

Aldermore - 5 Year Fixed Rate Bond

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.45% AER

Open with

£1,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid annually. The maximum you can pay into the account is £1,000,000

Aldermore - 5 Year Fixed Rate Bond Monthly

Aldermore - 5 Year Fixed Rate Bond Monthly

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.45% AER

Open with

£1,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 5 years, the interest is paid monthly. The maximum you can pay into the account is £1,000,000

Tandem - 3 Year Fixed Saver

Tandem - 3 Year Fixed Saver

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.45% AER

Open with

£1,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 3 years, the interest is paid annually. The maximum you can pay into the account is £2,500,000

UBL - 7 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account

UBL - 7 Year Fixed Term Deposit Account

Compensation scheme

FSCS

Headline rate

1.45% AER

Open with

£2,000

Opened by

You may be able to make withdrawals, but you may lose interest and other fees and charges may apply. This bond is for 7 years, the interest is paid annually. The maximum you can pay into the account is £1,000,000
  • Guide to savings
  • Fixed rate bonds FAQs
  • About our savings accounts comparison
A savings account enables you to earn interest on your money – and up to £85,000 slotted away with a UK-regulated bank or building society is protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS).
But however much you can save, it’s worth making your money work as hard as possible. Taking a little time to compare rates could boost the amount of interest you earn, beating inflation, or the rising cost of living.

Bear in mind that the personal savings allowance (PSA) means you can now earn £1,000 interest per year without paying tax on your savings– or £500 if you’re a higher rate taxpayer. So the vast majority of savers are no longer paying tax on their savings.

There are several factors to take into consideration when comparing rates.
In this guide
When you need the money
The best rates are typically available on fixed-rate accounts – which means you’ll need to lock your money away. But these won’t suit if you’re likely to need the cash over the short-term. Withdrawing your cash during the fixed-rate period will mean you incur a penalty – typically, loss of interest. In some cases penalties can be hefty. For example, if you lock money away in a seven-year Cash ISA, the penalty could amount to one year's worth of interest. So consider your options and search for an account that’ll work for you.
What you think will happen to rates
If you lock your money away, and the government raises interest rates, you could miss out. Conversely, if interest rates fall, you’d benefit from saving in a fixed-rate account. So take into consideration what you think will happen to interest rates.

The longer your money is locked away, the bigger the risk.
How proactive you are willing to be
Unfortunately, there are plenty of savings accounts paying a pitiful £1 on every £1,000 of savings. But comparing and switching to a better rate needn’t take more than a few minutes. You can easily open accounts online, but you may still feel you don’t have the time. Alternatively, if you’ve plenty to put away you could place a chunk in an easy access account, some in a fixed-rate account that earns more interest, and slot a portion into a regular saver – these accounts often pay a decent rate.

If you’re switching your current account There are plenty of incentives to switch current accounts – from £175 cash, to cashback and interest-free overdrafts. Also, if you’ve got a smaller amount saved – say, several thousand pounds - some current accounts pay decent rates of interest on your cash. So it’s worth checking these out.

Current account switching game:
Use the new switching service to move accounts – which takes around seven days. Contact your new account provider, and ask for a form. However, if you’re likely to apply for a large amount of credit within the next few years, you may want to stay with your current provider. Bank account stability is a factor in lending decisions, and switching accounts may impact your credit score and the rate you’re offered. You could switch several times to maximise potential incentives, although beware of the impact on your credit record. For example:
  • Switch your current account to HSBC advance £175;
  • Once the switch is complete and the money paid switch to First Direct, to benefit from £100 incentive
Total from incentives alone = £275
Maximising savings on £10,000
  • £9,000 into Marcus (Easy Access at 1.45% AER
  • Put £500 into Coventry Regular Saver paying 2.5% AER (no withdrawal restrictions)
  • Put £500 into Principality Regular Saver paying 2% each month
To maximise the interest you earn, you could withdraw £1,000 from your savings with Marcus each month, saving £500 into the Coventry Regular Saver and £500 into the Principality one-year bond. Over a year, this would amount to around £190 in interest, before tax. If you’d saved the entire sum in Marcus for the year, you’d earn £135, or £55 less.
Different types of account
Instant access savings
Instant access accounts allow you to withdraw your money at any time without any restrictions. You can make as many withdrawals as you want, without penalty.
Easy access savings
Your money is easily accessible, but you may face a short delay before you can take out your money. You may also be restricted in the number of withdrawals you can make, without penalty.
Notice accounts
Some accounts will offer higher rates of interest but only pay back the money after a notice period. Like easy access accounts, notice accounts may come with restrictions on the number of withdrawals you can make without penalties being applied.
Fixed Rate Bonds
If you put your money into a fixed-rate bond you will not usually be able to withdraw the money until the end of the fixed-rate period.
Cash ISAs
You can save up to £20,000 in the 2019/20 tax year without being subject to income tax on any interest you earn in a cash Individual Savings Account (ISA). The allowance limit is across all ISAs, so if you have a cash ISA and an investment ISA, the total placed into them may not exceed £20,000. The interest rates on Cash ISAs are not as high as on easy access accounts. So it typically onlly makes sense to save into an ISA only if you’re likely to earn more interest than your tax-free Personal Savings Allowance - and that means having more than around £60,000 in savings.

Other considerations
Over the long term, investment returns have typically been higher than those offered from standard savings accounts. You may earn returns of 5% a year on investments, but this is far from guaranteed, and you can lose money as well as gain money. Saving in the stock market should only be for when you’ve established a sufficient cash pot for emergencies – and with a long-term focus, such as retirement.

Yes, there are plenty of different types of savings accounts. You may also want to look at peer to peer lending for potentially higher rates of interest over a fixed period. But the rates aren't guaranteed, and bear in mind that the money is not protected under the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS).

Yes, if something goes wrong, your money will be protected under this scheme.

Yes, any fixed rate bonds in a single institution up to the value of £85,000 per person is protected under this scheme.

Yes, your credit file is only a factor when applying for new borrowing. You can open any savings product without having to worry about your the impact on your credit file.

Yes, but keep in mind that this money may not be readily accessible.

Fixed-rate bonds offer a variety of different terms, usually from 1 to 2, but can run for up to 7 years.

The end of the term is called the maturity date, and you will be informed by either email or post about the term ending. You have the following options:

  • Cash out
  • Reinvest the entire amount
  • Reinvest the entire amount and put in additional money
  • Reinvest but withdraw some of the money beforehand
  • Close the fixed bond completely
If you don't do anything the money will likely be moved into a low interest account.

You can close some accounts early - this depends on the terms and conditions. So if you think you may need the money earlier, check the small print. Even if you can close an account early, there may be other accounts that are more suitable as you will probably pay a penalty for the withdrawal or account closure.

You will find that some base rate tracker savings bond providers will allow you to give notice to close the account early, or charge you based on the same notice period. For example:

  • If you give 90 days’ notice when closing the bond, you will not be charged
  • Or, you lose 90 days’ interest if you did not give notice about closing the fixed rate bond earlier than anticipated.

We have a Savings account data feed from the data specialists defaqto. They provide us with over 100 daily updated data items that we use to compile our various savings and ISA listings on Everything Financial.

Defaqto have a team dedicated to ensuring the information that they provide to us and others is accurate. However, it is your responsibility to check the details of any products and services before you apply.

Getting data from defaqto, running servers and employing a team to run the website costs money. So, like almost all comparison sites we list the best “affiliated” links first, but ordered according to the sorting options displayed. We then display the unaffiliated links after this.

The listings are ordered by whichever feature you have shown an interest in.
For savings based listings, this is typically according to the AER (Annual Equivalent Rate). In most cases, the secondary order is alphabetical, to for ease of searching. On pages with more than 30 listings we may also provide additional sort and filter options to allow you to more easily find products of interest to you.

We have excluded accounts with geographical boundaries as they are not relevant to most of our users.

Defaqto have a set of criteria that they use to assess the quality of different current accounts. Broadly speaking a 5 star product will have lots of features and a one star product won't.

In many cases, a savings account is a savings account and the features that determine the rating are more easily expressed by showing those features. As such, we have shown those features rather than the star ratings whether we have thought the features are more relevant to your decision making.

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